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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)
. afterrhurricanes katrina and read it, the fund was $18 billion in the hole and still has that debt. then there is the issue of management. the government accountability office wrote a stinging criticism of the agency just last year describing? as actuarially unsound. it's systems are antiquated, running on pen and paper and imagine that, rather than computers. the department's at local state and national levels as a result have a difficult time communicating with fema. according to that report because of many of the process is the manual, the culture have become dependent on individual people. staff relying on personal relationships to accomplish tasks. including -- concluded from the gao, a total revamp. maybe that is why the improperly paid nearly $100 million to hurricane victims after katrina and rita between 2005 and 2010. just earlier this month the agency waived its demands for repayment. altogether, 371 million was paid out in error. taken a reminder to everybody out there, that's our money fellow taxpayers. remember katrina trailers, 145,000 of them deemed unsafe because t
it will be sold for a plot of property on the beach. >> did we learn enough from katrina? it seems that people did evacuate, but we didn't have the same problems post-katrina that we did last time in terms of people getting to safety ahead of the storm. from your observation, do you think that's accurate? >> i think all of our professional forecasters -- boy, did they get the right. a week out, they knew this tropical system was going to explode, the way it did take this left hook into new jersey. it has been katrina-esque. the man holding the camera, dwyane scott, was with me in new orleans overnight for that storm. for weeks thereafter, we've been talking about it nonstop today. we may have to rethink some of our shoreline rules and definitions. we've got governors of three states, christie, malloy, cuomo, those three states are talking about a new shoreline and maybe a new normal. maybe we need our folks at the weather channel to tell us, is this a 200-year storm or the start of 200 years worth of storms like this. >> is there a spirit of rebuilding here? do you hear frit the locals? have you b
airlines to talk about the impact on the industry and the man who led fema during hurricane katrina will tell us what the federal emergency agency should expect from this storm. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use, it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. you have to dig a little. fidelity's etf market tracker shows you the big picture on how different asset classes are performing, and it lets you go in for a closer look at areas within a class or sector that may be bucking a larger trend. i'm stephen hett of fidelity investments. the etf market tracker is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. get 200 free trades today and explore your next investing idea. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. >> we talked
up in flames and four other houses. >> we think back about katrina and what a big impact that was on our country, we rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm, we think of the aftermath. right now we're in the aftermath period in terms of sandy. tell me how you feel about that. and before we get to rebuilding, people taking care of continuing damage right now, how do you assess the coordination between the state, federal, and local municipalities? >> i think we're doing very well. i think the president's response has been terrific, really. it's been coordinated unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard governor christie, who is a republican with president obama working together, and that's how it's been from the president, to the governor, to the counties and the towns. one of the things that i did today was talk to fema about trying to get an office and staff person in various parts of the district today, and they're working on it, and with the money that comes to downs for recovery to rebuild board walks or municipal buildings, i t
a comparison with hurricane katrina. i want to use it as an analogy. but the analogy here that might be helpful, we think back to katrina and what that meant to us as a nation. we very rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm. right now we are in the aftermath period of this superstorm, sandy. how do you feel in terms of dealing with the aftermath, describing those explosions, these ongoing worries. before we get to rebuilding, rescuing people, taking care of continuing damage right now. how would you assess the response and the coordination between the federal government, the state government, municipalities. how are we doing? >> i think we're doing very well. i mean, you heard the president, and i have to say that i think his response has been terrific, really. and it's been coordinated, unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard, you know, governor christie, who's a republican, with president obama, working together. and that's how it's been, from the president to the governor, all the way down to the county and the towns. so one of the things that i di
should have said with katrina. they have used the ploy and bush. hey i was told not to come in there that they didn't need the gridlock. this proves it. if you think. >> bill: let me set it up, that bloomberg told president obama and dennis miller not to come to new york. miller defied him but the president did not because the president is doing lump lomb lombado. >> in a heavily populated metropolitan area. they both start with new, new orleans or new york. the one mayor was hiding out in the penthouse trying to stay soft. >> bill: you couldn't freeze traffic zones because traffic isn't moving. >> i was 10 blocks away, billy. i gave up after 40 minutes and just walked over. >> bill: you can't go anywhere because the subways are out. >> just remember that folks when they tell you they were heartless and bush was heartless. they don't want the president in major area. good for bloomberg for saying it. >> bill: do you think that the hurricane is going to have any influence on the presidential vote next week? >> no. but i would watch west virginia. you know, they often say the
government has stepped in to help. this is the third hurricane i've covered in my lifetime, andrew, katrina and now this. we are at the point where the population gets furious and they turn on the government. the government can just not handle the huge, huge logistical requirements that happen after a storm like this. could this actually turn on the president at some point here? >> reporter: i don't think so. i think what the president has had the opportunity to do is show americans that he was involved in an effort that the country was rallying behind and do his job in a way that got praise by the keynote speaker at the republican convention, chris christie, very tough critic of the president otherwise. so i don't think many voters are going to blame president obama for what's going on right now, and leave aside the fact that the states in which the difficulties are occurring db new york, new jersey, connecticut are all reliantly democratic states. what is much more important to the outcome of this election, michelle, is what's going on behind me at this afl-cio phone bank where union volu
associated with the storm. point of reference, hurricane katrina, around $80 billion of damage alone with another $80 billion in economic damage in the aftermath of katrina. so 20 right now for damage in new york, plus another 20, 25 economic activity. i think those numbers will go substantially higher when they really find out. >> steve: plus there are so many houses they haven't been able to get to. the barrier islands south on the jersey shore, people haven't been able to get there because they were essentially washed out. >> gretchen: the interesting thing about politics relating to the storms is what is the right move for politicians, especially when we're six days away from a monumental presidential election? remember the scathing interpretation that president bush got with regard to hurricane katrina. so what is the right response? the president has to come and has to survey the situation, so what should mitt romney do? he's our -- can you imagine the discussions going on inside these camps about what is the right tone? what looks correct? >> eric: i hate to do this, but i rem
. do you think they would have run the new orleans marathon the week of katrina? >> right. i don't think so. >> steve: of course not. >> gretchen: rest of the headlines for saturday. president obama ordering the military to send extra gallons of fuel to new york and in the wake of seand. gas shortages unless people panicked. gas will be rationed starting at noon people with license plates ending in odd number will only be able to buy gas. cars with license plates ending in even number can fill up on even numbered days. four ohio men busted for stealing mitt romney campaign signs. some were found in a union truck. police found tools that could be used to take signs down. local campaign workers have had problems with signs being stolen. this the is first time someone has been caught. the men were arrested and face misdemeanor charges. people in parts ofism know are going to have to pony up extra money if they want to buy a gun now. cook county, which includes chicago, has approved a tax that charges people 2 a dollars for every gun that they buy. well, the move is expected to raise
hurricane katrina. they saw all of the dead bodies afterwards. >> steve: if this was a republican president do you think that the main stream media would handle it differently? the president's photop in new jersey is now in las vegas. >> eric: i love chris christy and he did victory laps with president obama and for fema, but where is fema? i am in favor of letting the states handle all of these things. but if you are going to do victory laps and say fema is the greatest institution in the last four or five years, they better be here. i haven't seen anything. not a thing. it is a disaster over there. >> gretchen: we have much to discuss this morning! in the meantime a fight for -- >> steve: fuel. >> gretchen: you know beha, we have so much to tuke about. >> steve: gas line in new jersey two miles line. >> gretchen: and the obama administration failing to call in back up as four americans attacked in libya. we'll continue to focus. did the white house leave them to die? former army chief-of-staff jack king is here to react. >> steve: media bias exist and proof is in the numbers and we have g
with the business of politics is impacted by weather and remember, katrina and what happened with george w. bush's reputation, it's impacted other politicians along the way. let's talk now about the actual event itself. george is a storm chaser. george, have you ever seen-- first of all, it's such a late season hurricane and it's meeting with the arctic air from canada and the low pressure system coming from the west. what's going to -- what's going to happen. first of all, what's it like where you are and what's going to happen? >> well, right now, i'm similar to the weather system from canada, i'm on myself on my way from canada. it's calm right now. getting near the pa-new jersey border getting into position to go down near the water in jersey or long island and i've never seen anything quite like this. been through about 16 hurricanes, including katrina, rita and ike and although this isn't the most powerful storm i've been in, it's certainly the largest and i'm curious to see what's going to happen because it's not often you see this type of combination of weather systems, impacting a pop l
the economic effects. i think comparing this episode to katrina, which is the analog a lot of people are working with, for the most part i would say on balance, there's a lot of short-term turmoil, a lot of things happening. it's the end of the month. we've already got a lot of other anxiety out there. and it's in the middle of earning season so we'll have some delays. on the other hand, if we look at markets in '05, there was an initial selloff but markets sort of gained traction, especially as people saw past the short-term economic effects and saw the lift coming from the spending. >> no doubt about it, we have end of month positioning, so if you're sitting on positions and you need to get out of those positions for whatever reason, because it's the end of the month, you can't do it. the markets are closed. and so i'm wondering if this is creating a pent-up situation where we see a heavy selloff once markets do resume on wednesday. we're hoping for wednesday. we haven't seen a two-day closing of markets, i don't think ever. >> that's right. >> i think it's possible we could see so
far in advance. >> have you covered many hurricane, katrina and isaac. compare, if you can, for us, some of the images you are seeing of sandy and images that you yourself took from those two storms? >> well, katrina was a fascinating experience, very destructive and the biggest storm i think i have seen, certainly the most destructive hurricane. i was -- dicover isaac a few months ago and irene in new york city. people are learning very quickly, the power of water. it doesn't sound that dramatic. but, boy, when you see it energized and pushed up the way sandy was, it's an awakening. >> we have had at least 69 deaths reported from sandy, so far from when it touched down in the cribbia, to here across the east coast. what about the dangers of the storms? you personally? have you ever experienced close calls? >> hurricane charlie in 2004, intensified unexpectedly and turned and came into the ponte gorda area in florida and nearly killed my partner, greg, a meteorologist and myself. i have learned to be extra careful. i was very satisfied to see how much warning was given regarding sa
. while we are going down the streets, it reminded me of what we experienced in 2005 with katrina. fortunately in this city, no one has died. there are no confirmed injuries. that is the good news. but it certainly looked like new orleans. what also looked like new orleans, when you looked in the windows. what we saw in the windows were children, mothers and fathers, waving at us, in most cases smiling. people on balconies waving at us. why were they smiling? what they've seen is the water receding. that's the good news, it's gone down from yesterday. the reason they can't get out of their homes is because the water not only is four or five feet deep, but there are also believed to be live power lines in the water. so it could be fatal to walk outside your house. spirits seem good but it was sure strange to see people in their windows, stuck in their homes with no power whatsoever, no heat and in some cases not a lot of food or water. we also saw people who seemed a little disoriented and confused and were trying to get out of their homes. in one case i saw two people trying to dr
how much money geico has made since the katrina year, how much buffett has made? a fortune. what was that, 2005? >> yeah. >> but i do wonder if you did have trading this morning, what somebody look travelers or berkshire would be trading at. >> but weaved had less hurricanes since 2005 than you would think. >> refinery, do you know anything about the plants around here? >> i don't know the specific plans, but i know that's certainly a risk. about 7% of the nation's refining is done here in new jersey and dwell wear. and they're right in the path. absolutely right in the path. so i would expect to see those guys shut in if they haven't already. which will impact obviously gas prices. >> there was speculation how you could see oil prices drop because no one will be taking supply. >> that's true. absolutely. >> paul, thank you very much. you'll be in-house with us. >> i'm weathering the storm here. >> andrew, i'm not kidding, last week, a sociologist writing for the huffington "post" said if this doesn't get us to completely try to get off all fossil fuels as quickly as we possibly
're operating. this is cover of "the washington post." this is new york's katrina. obviously the death toll compared to that storm nowhere near approaching it but still 20 some odd people dead in new york alone. 2 million people without power. for those of you that live around here, we hope you're safe and your homes are okay and families are okay. if you're in other parts of the country or the world trying to trade today, there are going to be business decisions, trading decisions to be made. >> we don't know how badly the insurance is going to do. it's up to you. you may think it's bad for insurance. maybe it's good. we don't have a good ballpark of how much and more importantly, so much of the damage is flooding, which historically has been one of those things where you call the insurance company and they say did you read the fine print? we don't cover flooding. the federal government has at various times extended flood insurance and helped people. particularly when anyone remembers the fiasco where the federal government says, listen rich people, you can build beautiful houses again. th
. conversely, if there is a problem. we think about katrina and other things, this could be bad for the president. but let's say that the federal response is appropriate. well, people just expect him to do that. the real issue here is florida, virginia, new hampshire, later this week, ohio. what happens to this much-needed push for early voting by the democrats that they have stated their victory on. what happens to that. there is torrential rain lashing of them. the president can't afford to give up any day or any minute of this voting drive that is so crucial to democratic. megyn: chris, thank you so much. also in the crosshairs of the storm, we will continue to watch it there as well is here. chris mentioned hurricane sandy causing problems and virginia. i mentioned the videotape earlier. near people already said to be without power. authorities say that up to 1 million people could be in the dark when all is said and done. power outages being reported in the new york area. the city of norfork, virginia. we will show you the tracking of the storm that could damage a chunk of
to hurricane katrina. when that happened late august of 2005, both of these stocks were on the move up. both of them actually traded right near their all time high and in the last few years they tumbled. lowe's went to, and home depot ultimately with 21 with the cash of the market. and people who bought katrina, and long-term investment got waxed pretty good. fast forward, lowe's last time missed the street by a nickel and home depot beat by 4 cents and concensus estimates, and went up home depot, there's a downgrade recently on home depoe and two upgreats on lowe's. to me, i can lie home depot, i think they have better operators and storms and when the storm path went and i just happen to think it's a better operation, better historical execution, so i would be willing to pay extra for it, for both of the stocks. cheryl: and-- >> $30 for lowe's, 58 for home depot and break out 63 for home depot i think it takes off or break out at 33 for lowe's, that could be a takeoff point. cheryl: another positive, unfortunately, coming out of this storm you're going to have new construction and you're g
very well. i discovered this stock after hurricane katrina. i'd never heard of it before and all of a sudden katrina came through, it went from augus august 2052 this yea 2005. they made an acquisition. the made an acquisition 1.2 $1.5 all cash acquisition. what i like about this, they do the hazard that have safety-kleen to recycle last year they took 400 million gallons of waste and turn it into reusable. they cleaned it up and were able to sell it. i think this is a perfect fit. this is not just a hurricane play, so we're going long-term. a trend that will be absolutely phenomenal. i don't know why the stock is down so much but i that it is at opportunity. cheryl: you have one more, i believe as well. >> g. nrc, so a lot of stuff out about it. after we talked in front of the stock traded more than 100% daily volume, the ceo has gone bonkers. this'll be huge for them to a lot of people have thought about getting a generator. people's minds will be made up in the next week or so. these are not the $900 generators. we have an order in for one of them just two weeks ago and i am n
to katrina and crazy storms like that and just amazing and i mean we weren't kidding when we were saying five to seven days, may be two weeks for some people and i know everyone went to the grocery stores and grabbed whatever they could. the way i've seen it, it plays out, the first day is interesting. you don't have power. the second day you start to get a little annoyed as you have no more ice and things start to go bad, day three, four and five, people just start getting angry and it's not fun and it gets ugly in a hurry. >> let me ask you just really quickly because the storm is continuing to move and i got this update on the potential impact in the midwest. chicago lake shore flood warning, high winds in indiana, extreme high winds in northwest ohio. >> damage in cleveland yesterday. >> 23,000 without power in michigan. a village in wisconsin. evacuated at least partially due to sandy. how long are we going to continue to feel the effects of sandy. >> a little bit in those areas but not as bad as yesterday and people saying lake erie was at the highest levels of off of cleveland they've
precautions. don't bring gas barbecues inside. one of the biggest problems with katrina people cooking inside with outdoor gas barbecues. you don't want to say i don't know how i am going to cook. think before you do something. carbon monoxide ox is insidious and can get you. >> what about mold? >> as the waters start to recede we are going to see more and more mold. i want people who are asthmatics out there keep the maas metic pumps ready. stress is a big provoker of heart disease. people who are underlying heart disease have to be particularly watchful. don't go out in a flood try to stay and wait until we can make things safe. >> a lot of people are fearful a lot of elderly folks. one lady her mom is staten island flood waters all over the place. the whole island was under water. what is your recommendation for those who are in fear? >> the two big treatments for fear one is information which we are trying to give now the other is standing together a sense of community. people helping each other. that can bring out the best in people. i am hoping to see it now. we haven't had lower manhat
. but it's brutal. this is our version of katrina. i've been touring the south shore today in my district, and the devastation is enormous. what you're showing on your screen is typical of many areas on long island. right now the county executive is meeting with fema to set up plans as to how the recovery will take place. work is coming in from all over the country to work with lipa, to restore the power, but it's going to be a tough haul. i can say that everything that can be done is being done. over the next several days, you'll see more power being restored. this could go on for another ten days to two weeks. >> are there still people missing? there are a lot of people who chose to ride this storm out. a lot of people who weren't even in areas that were supposed to be at high risk and they're still there. >> yeah. for instance, long beach, which is an island 30,000, 40,000 people on the island. many of them stayed, and i was talking to several people today. and this is just anecdotal. friends of theirs who cannot find their wife or daughters or their sons, cousins, people in homes who
a month after the storm, katrina, on the mississippi coast, speaking with the mayor of a small town down there where for a mile inland everything was rubble. he started to tell me, our problems now are mental. walking around in this, living in this, not being able to making progress, and a lot of people had severe psychological problems. is that something that is on your mind yet? >>guest: our biggest fear right now is people are going to become anxious when it comes to getting order to their lives. the longer it takes for them to get some sort of order, the more that depression will set in because this is their life. >>shepard: certainly the we are thinning about you. what do you need down there, quickly, before we go? >>guest: electricity. that will make all the difference in the word because we have, we cannot by any food, we cannot buy gasoline and we cannot heat our home. we have gas, we have good water, we need electric. we hope, we have 10 percent of the town lit up again and we are hoping they make great progress as they normally do. that is what we need. >>shepard: we are too, m
than triple what hurricane irene cost. but still far plea record costs of hurricane katrina several years ago. governor christy hie has pledgeo rebuild the shore but that would come at an even greater cost. and where he withstand, we have to tell you as we were driving in, there are actually school buses blocking the flooded roads. you can imagine with no school in session and very thin police availability given everything that's going on, all the emergency situations, they're use aing school buses to deter cars from going down dangerous roads.aing school buses to dete cars from going down dangerous roads.ing school buses to deters from going down dangerous roads. this boat was across the street and police have propped it up to get it out of the way so that emergency vehicles can keep going. of course that's the only way that you can get on the island here. back to you. >> have there been other people that you've seen out on the streets or is it pretty deserted aside from the emergency personnel? >> reporter: it's actually very deserted. and it's pretty eerie. i've seen all the pict
, the west coast. >> that was one of famous of our colleagues years ago, during katrina, we were talking about how many poles had been town and she looked in to the camera and said just know it stay calm, help is on the way. and we all said no one can hear you. they don't have power. it was a very heartfelt sincere help is on the way, but the people that needed it were not in front of the tv set at the time. >> you send out a reminder e-mail is down. >> and then by the time it's back up -- >> isn't it crazy that e-mail is work something. >> you're right, verizon was working. >> coming up, we'll talk to governor markell to check out the damage in delaware. well find out how his state made it through the night. up. a short word that's a tall order. up your game. up the ante. and if you stumble, you get back up. up isn't easy, and we ought to know. we're in the business of up. everyday delta flies a quarter of million people while investing billions improving everything from booking to baggage claim. we're raising the bar on flying and tomorrow we will up it yet again. governor of getting i
. and if you don't, there's a disaster. let's just look at what happened at hurricane katrina. >> yeah. >> let's look at what happened to hurricane katrina. you know what, though? again this is part of a bigger problem with mitt romney right now and republicans and democrats that are afraid to talk about how you really save this country and tackle the debt. instead, they talked about silly things like cutting fema, cutting big bird or saying we're going to take care of all of our problems by raising some taxes on rich people. instead of talking about saving this country for the next generation. >> and also not being honest about defense. >> and both sides not being honest about defense. >> okay. thank you. >> how's that? >> good. >> i don't define fema as quote big government. >> right. >> i define entitlement programs by their numbers that are going to cripple us as, quote, big government. >> "wall street journal," barack obama -- when the history of this administration is written, maybe someone will note the difference. here is that man who promised a transformative presidency, and it amount
, if you don't know, covered katrina for us, ap he's prone to understatements, so when he says he went through one of the most harrowing experiences he's experienced. >> says a lot. >> a pretty dramatic statement. you highlight, scott, why you can have so many deaths due to flooding in situations like this, because that water moved so fast and with so much power. >> it does, and as i said, again, at the top of the hour, i said they told us there wou about five more feet of water. we expected it to be a little more gradual than it was, and when it comes up, it comes up fast. it's not a wall of water. it's just that all of a sudden you find yourself with a lot of water around you, and then you're scrambling into your vehicles, including your satellite truck, trying to get out of there with water basically coming up over the foot. i mean, it was that bad. you know, we are all fine. everybody got out of there in one piece, and we hope to be able to send you some pictures later on this evening, or at least tomorrow morning, but it was quite an experience. >> i'll bet. scott, stay safe. you
perspective, there was a sturgeon that happened during hurricane katrina, not in new orleans but in south mississippi that was higher than 30 feet. the highest ever recorded. and that wiped out entire communities for a mile inland. here we are talking up to 11 feet and if it happens and the surge happens the way they have said, it will flood much of lower manhattan, it's already flooded the fdr drive along the side and it's just beginning because high tide is 45 minutes away. atlantic city's public safety director says much of that city is now under water. some pictures of road 30. one of the major roads into atlantic city. a writer for the philadelphia enquirer newspaper nearby sent us these pictures. part of the city's historic board walk is now in the sea. other parts have collapsed there. and the new jersey governor chris christie ordered all of atlantic city's casinos to shut down. he did that, it's only the fourth time officials have closed those casinos since the city legalized gambling more than three decades ago. storm chaser dennis sherrod joins us now. is he live in atlantic ci
president obama and hurricane sandy and president bush and hurricane katrina. that may happen. >> bill: yeah, but i don't think that's going to happen. it's retail politics now. the factor has, i have spoken at the highest levels with the romney campaign and the obama campaign. i said hey, listen, you have got to do an interview with me. it will be a worldwide event. everybody will be watching it. it will be on the internet. you know, this is something you have got to do. they basically say well, that's the word they used that's intriguing. that means he you don't have a chance in hell. intriguing means it is not going to happen. i understand president obama he would have to answer questions about lynn i can't. not -- libya. it's not going to be brian williams here. is he not going to do it because of that i can't understand why mitt romney is not doing it because mitt romney has a story to tell. in my opinion, he has a story to tell. but i think what the strategy is on the romney campaign is to retail it in ohio, virginia, florida, colorado, and nevada real strong and then we have the elect
power has already been restored but it's brutal. this is really our version of katrina. i'm not saying any two tragedies are alike but i've been touring the south shore today in my district and massapequa, lindenhurst, what you're showing is typical of many areas on long island. fema the county executives are meeting with fema to set up exact plans as to how recovery will take place. workers are coming in from all over the country to restore the power but it's a tough haul. i don't want to give anyone any false hope. everything that can be done is being done. i think over the next several days you will see more power being restored but this could go on for another ten days to two weeks. >> are there people still missing? what we saw in hoboken, new jersey, 20,000 people are still there, stuck with water beneath their apartments and their homes but there are a lot of people who chose to ride this storm out, a lot of people who weren't in areas that were supposed to be at high risk and they're still there. >> yes, for instance long beach, which is an island probably 34,000 people on the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)